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ATU549 – Holiday Show 2021 Part 2

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Your weekly dose of information that keeps you up to date on the latest developments in the field of technology designed to assist people with disabilities and special needs.

Special Guests:

Nikol Prieto  – Community Outreach Coordinator – INDATA Project at Easterseals Crossroads

Brian Norton – Director of Assistive Technology – Easterseals Crossroads

Items discussed on the show today:

Home Section:

SofiHub Solutions: https://www.sofihub.com/

Amazon Astro: https://amzn.to/3CDhAjE

Indoor Mosquito Trap: https://amzn.to/3nxBacP

 

Fun Section:

Eone – The Bradley Watch: https://bit.ly/3CCpCcu

MPG Kids SmartWatch: https://bit.ly/2Z3BUNo

3Doodler: https://bit.ly/30zHw2l

Dodow Sleep Aid: https://bit.ly/30Entjs

JellyFish Lamp: https://amzn.to/30G8x42

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If you have an AT question, leave us a voice mail at: 317-721-7124 or email tech@eastersealscrossroads.org
Check out our web site: http://www.eastersealstech.com
Follow us on Twitter: @INDATAproject
Like us on Facebook: www.Facebook.com/INDATA

——- Transcript Starts Here —–

Josh Anderson, Nikol Prieto, Brian Norton:
Happy holidays from the Assistive Technology Center at Easter Seals Crossroads. This is your assistive technology update.

Josh Anderson:
Hello folks and welcome back to part two of our annual Holiday Gift Giving Guide. For those of you who might have missed our show last week, this year’s guests are Brian Norton and Nikol Prieto. Thanks for joining us as we talk a little bit about what we do for the holidays, as well as discuss some of the cool little gadgets that are out there that could make great gifts yourself, or for someone that you love.

Josh Anderson:
Next week, we’ll be back to our normal format with some exciting new guests to finish out the rest of the year. Don’t forget, if you have an idea for someone who could be a guest on our show or any other feedback, please give us a call on our listener line at 317-721-7124, send us an email at tech@eastersealscrossroads.org, or hit us up on Twitter, @INDATAproject. As always, thank you so much for listening and now, let’s go ahead and get on with the show.

Josh Anderson:
Guys, we get on to our next question. Brian, you brought this up a little bit earlier, but let’s talk about holiday shopping. So, are you guys early or late shoppers? Do you prefer online or in person? Brian already kind of talked about it. We’ll let him talk about it in a minute, but Nikol, what about you?

Nikol Prieto:
Definitely have become online. We have started with our family, just drawing some names on one side of the family, and then the kids all get spoiled rotten. Also my rule, most of the time, for all my kids’ gifts usually, is that we’re doing an activity. So, we’re going to go to a Pacers game. We’re going to go to a concert. They’d get small gifts, but most of our gifts are a way for us to spend quality time together- [crosstalk 00:02:13] …and get people off their phones, off their devices and out enjoying things.

Josh Anderson:
Nice. So they can sit at the Pacer game on their phone?

Nikol Prieto:
Yes, exactly.

Josh Anderson:
… And I always say that, because I know I was watching a game the other day and as they pan up to the crowd, there’s two guys standing up and everyone else is just sitting down, looking at their phone-

Nikol Prieto:
[crosstalk 00:02:30] It drives me… [crosstalk 00:02:31] it drives me crazy. Why did you spend that much money to do that?

Josh Anderson:
[crosstalk 00:02:34] To go look at your phone? You know, I’ve always… At concerts is the big one that gets me, when I see folks doing that. But anyway, I’m going off on a rant here… Brian, what about you?

Brian Norton:
So yeah, I did mention this a little bit earlier, but we do… It depends on how early is early… We do Black Friday shopping every year. It’s become kind of a tradition for my side of the family. So, we go visit my side of the family for Thanksgiving and we’ll do that immediately afterwards and have a ton of fun just hanging out with each other. Now, I will say I don’t do a lot of the shopping, I live in a household that has three women in the house and so, they do a lot of the shopping.

Brian Norton:
Again, to Nikol’s point, we’ve done a lot less gifts. Mostly, if it’s a gift it’s clothing or something that we really need like pots and pans or sheets or other kinds of things we’re going to use around the house. Most of our gifts are our experiences, we’ve started to look at doing stuff like that because, we want that same thing, we want to be with family and those types of things. I think that’s the most important thing for us at this point.

Brian Norton:
My daughters are a little bit older. They’re starting to get a little bit more independent and kind of going off and their own thing. We’re trying to soak up as much one-on-one time, or family time, that we can get with them as we can. So, we’ve kind of moved to experiences, but yeah, always doing Black Friday shopping of some sort, though.

Josh Anderson:
Nice. Personally, I start… I don’t know, sometime in the Fall, probably… But that’s just kind of finding things that, “Oh, that’s something they’ll like. It’s on sale, let’s go ahead and do it.” And then, I have to hide stuff because I am not good at holding onto gifts at all. I’ve already got things wrapped and put in boxes and hidden in the garage. Not from the kids- [crosstalk 00:04:12] … but so that I don’t [crosstalk 00:04:13] … I don’t give it to people. We do a lot of it online.

Josh Anderson:
Sometimes, it’s just kind of as you’re walking through Target or Meyer or something, “Hey, let’s stop by the clearance rack, see what they’ve got. Oh, that’s great. That’s something they wanted.”… and things. But then we also, my wife and I, have a habit of trying to find unique things. So like, not the video game store, but the game store, the places that have board games and stuff. They always have unique, neat gifts that are kind of cool, so we always try to find a few of those and some surprises and stuff.

Josh Anderson:
My stepdaughter’s 20 and she will just send us Amazon links to all the things that she wants, and I want to buy none of them. And we usually buy it from my account, so then, for the rest of the year, I get the weirdest requests on things I might like. [crosstalk 00:04:50]

Josh Anderson:
So that’s, I will say… But no, we usually, we do that and we do it up, pretty much starting sometime, again, in the Fall, and we usually stop about the day before we exchange gifts. Because you know, you still go out, and you look, and now I need something else, but… [crosstalk 00:05:02] that’s usually just the candy and the little stocking stuffer-

Brian Norton:
I think… Didn’t they say this year, you should have started a long time ago because they’re a little worried about- [crosstalk 00:05:09].

Nikol Prieto:
… the supply- [crosstalk 00:05:10]

Josh Anderson:
Yeah, I heard if there was something specific you want and you don’t have it, assume you won’t have it. They’ve even talked to a lot of shop owners that said, “Yeah, I’m fully stocked now.”… Or “I’ve got most of this stuff, but none of this stuff will come back.”… Or, “I ordered 80 of these. I got one.” Yeah, and things like that.

Josh Anderson:
So yeah… It’ll probably be a little weird, but if you’re doing experiences, you don’t have to wait on anything. [crosstalk 00:05:31] You know what I mean? You buy those tickets online, you print them out. Boom. [crosstalk 00:05:33] Put them in a card. Hey, you’re done. So that’s a really, really great way to go.

Nikol Prieto:
Another thing I would suggest, something I do is, if you see clearance candles and just things like that, I have to have a little cabinet of grab and go… Oops, I forgot. [crosstalk 00:05:48] Some event has come up. I need something. Oh, oh my gosh, you gave me a gift. Why? First of all, [crosstalk 00:05:53] cause now I have this girl that I have to run to my cabinet and dig around, see if there’s something appropriate for you… [crosstalk 00:05:58] But I do like to do that, a lot of that on Christmas.

Nikol Prieto:
Back to your point about supply… I was talking to a friend who is in retail and they said, “Our Halloween stuff is sitting on a ship and they should all get here about February so, I expect Christmas will be later in Spring for everything to get shipped over.”

Josh Anderson:
So I will be buy, I will be stocking up on, I’ll be decorated for Halloween next year, [crosstalk 00:06:17] buying it in February. They have to feel like they’re going to have a hard time storing it all. Maybe [crosstalk 00:06:22] we’ll get some good deals on Halloween stuff in February so you just let me know when you find them-

Brian Norton:
That’s awesome.

Josh Anderson:
For our next section, I thought we’d talk about… Is a few little things that can kind of help around the home. One of the things that I wanted to talk about is something called SOFIHUB solutions. Now, we had them on the show a while back and what this is, is kind of a way to monitor and respond to in-care residents, so individuals that maybe want to stay at home or just not have to have someone around all the time, to make sure that they’re doing what they need to be doing, to make sure that they’re safe, happy and okay. It can be a great solution for that. They’ve got a few different things. Again, they’ve been on the show so I can always put a link so you can go back and check that out but, I wanted to talk about some of the different stuff that they have.

Josh Anderson:
So, their whole home solution basically uses different sensors and things like that, just to make sure that people are doing their routine normally. I like this because it’s not cameras. You do not have cameras in the house or anything like that. It’s motion sensors so if… Let’s say that I was using this and it says, “Okay, Josh went into the restroom. Well, it’s been an hour and a half and he hasn’t come back out.” That’s a bit of an issue because that’s not normally how long it takes… You all laughed… That is not normally how long it takes… But just little things like that. Or, “Hey, they haven’t really went to the kitchen today. Have they eaten?”… Just little stuff like that, that we don’t realize are our normal routines or, I mean, kind of on the other end, “They’ve been in the kitchen 28 times already and it’s not even lunchtime”, you know, “They’re continuously opening up the fridge.”

Josh Anderson:
Just different stuff like that, that it can monitor, but then it can also give prompts and cues folks as well… “Hey, it’s 9:00 AM. Have you taken your medicine? Have you eaten your food? Have you done this, have you showered today?” Have you done that kind of stuff? You can really personalize it to the individual. But then, it’s also got some other things, fall detection. Their different devices can also do some different kind of geo-fencing, so we know that the individual goes outside and plays in the backyard… Well, they just jumped the fence and ran down the street, you know that could be an issue. So, a lot of different solutions. We’ll put a link to it and again, you can always go back and listen to it, and really hear about all their different solutions that they have.

Josh Anderson:
It’s an all-in-one kind of thing and you can really track and monitor people’s progress, especially if maybe they have goals that they need to do… You know, “Hey, by the middle of the day, we want to have laundry started and the dishes done.” So, we can kind of monitor and see that stuff but, I like it because it doesn’t have that camera aspect so it’s not as invasive as some other kind of solutions might be. Brian, you found that Amazon has a new device that can help out as well. Tell us about this guy.

Brian Norton:
Yeah, so we have an adaptive technology lab, assistive technology lab here and we’ve always had smart speakers on display. One of the things that Amazon recently came out with… I don’t know if it’s really readily available at this point, but it’s called the Amazon Astro. Basically it’s an echo device, if you will, but it’s a robot and it’s something that can go in and around your home… We have something called the Double Bot in our assistive technology lab. It’s a telepresence robot, but this is another device that’s similar in nature. Basically, it’s got an Amazon Echo on a little robot that you can basically employ all the amazing features of an Amazon Echo device to allow you to be able to control things in your environment, but also essentially monitor your home as well.

Brian Norton:
You can, it basically allows you to be able to move around your home so that you can be connected to it anywhere, you can have it go around your home… make sure you’re checking on things during the day. If it doesn’t recognize a person, it’s going to send you an alert to your phone. I think it also connects to a Ring Protect Pro subscription, so you can have it connected to that as well. Send it around… I don’t know. It looks really cool. I think it’s something you guys should really check out. It’s about a thousand dollars, so it’s $999 and 99 cents. That’s the introductory price, the total price after the introductory price, they’ve set it at about $1,450. So, it’s about $1,450. You can put your request in now, there’s limited quantities available. Essentially, you put a request in and they will get in touch with you, but really, it does look pretty cool.

Brian Norton:
Really, if you think about a telepresence robot, that’s not all that expensive comparatively, to some of the other ones that are out there and you’ve got proven technology on it, right? So, you’ve got the Amazon Echo, which has been around for a while. A lot of folks use it, not only for just convenience in and around the home, being able to ask it questions, play games, get it to do different things, order things online, shop, those types of things, but also stay in connection with other family members, and really control your environment, too. You can turn on lights, do those different things in and around your home… Really kind of a cool thing. Definitely check that out at amazon.com, it’s called Amazon Astro.

Josh Anderson:
Very nice. The other thing that I wanted to talk about here is something that I actually purchased not long ago and it’s called the Fenun, and I’m probably mispronouncing the name. It’s F-E-N-U-N, and essentially it’s an indoor mosquito catcher. What this thing does is… It’s a small device. It’s got a little UV looking light on top, and then a tiny fan that sucks things down and puts them on this little glue trap. So a very, very simple device, but I live out in the country and I have a dog that is missing a leg. So, to come inside the house, he has to spin around three times in order to come in, and in that time that he is waiting mosquitoes, gnats, all kinds of little critters, get inside my house constantly. And it’s impossible to get rid of them, no matter how many you get, you always find another one and I’ve tried darn near everything to do it.

Josh Anderson:
I found this online and they run… There’re tons of different brands, this is just the one that I happened to purchase. They run about $40, and what you do is you plug it in… It makes very little noise, just that tiny little fan noise, and it attracts them with that light. When they come up to the light, the fans sucks them down and they get stuck on this little glue board. I’ve had it for, at the time we recorded this, maybe two or three weeks and it’s probably caught 20 or 30 little gnats and little things that I did not even know were in my house. My fear is that it’s attracting them from outside, to come in and go to this thing, but it works really great.

Josh Anderson:
So for folks… And it can be a real challenge, again, living in the country, but… If you think of fruit flies, those darn little things that get in your garbage disposal and they’re almost impossible to get rid of, it’s a great little tool. It’s very lightweight. Again, it’s not very expensive, uses almost no electricity while it’s running and it can catch all these things.

Josh Anderson:
Now, it’s small, so it’s not going to catch your bees, your flies, your bigger things, but it’s just a nice tool. It’s very simple to use. It has one button on top and then another button that can make the lights change so it catches other things. So, a really useful thing… I could see how it could also be adaptive, just because it’s a whole lot easier than bringing a flyswatter around to try to get rid of this stuff. It’s been a really good thing for us and it has really helped out, and been a really good tool.

Josh Anderson:
So guys, as we kind of get closer to wrapping up here, just tell me, what is your favorite part of the holidays?… And, Nikol, I don’t mean Halloween.

Nikol Prieto:
I truly do like them all, but they pale in comparison into Halloween. Let’s all admit it.

Josh Anderson:
What, what is your favorite of the holidays? [crosstalk 00:14:00]

Nikol Prieto:
Just the downtime with family, the just not waking up to alarms. Maybe we stay in our jammies all day, we just kind of graze and eat the delicious food… Just the downtime with loved ones.

Brian Norton:
Yeah. Yeah, I would definitely agree with that… Being lazy around the house. It’s been every week… every day seems to be really super busy, and so for us all just to get together, hang around with each other. We also like to go see lights. We travel around and try to find the neighborhoods with the best lights and we’ll do that oh, maybe two or three times over the holiday season and just enjoy some of the festivities. Going to church, all that kind of stuff, it’s all super fun. So…

Josh Anderson:
I have to agree. It is just the slower pace. Most people are off work so, I don’t get half as many emails or phone calls or anything like that. And it really just, even if I can’t take all the whole time off, it’s just slower. I get so much more done. Then if I do actually get to spend time at home, my phone’s not going off all the time. All those kind of things. Everything’s a little bit more laid back, people seem to be in a better mood. Now, granted, I don’t go out a lot during that time, so maybe I’m wrong. Maybe everybody isn’t. But yeah, I just really, really do enjoy that and just getting to spend time with friends, family and loved ones is amazing.

Nikol Prieto:
They’re not getting along in parking lots at malls. That, to me, is the biggest nightmare… I’m shopping, angry [crosstalk 00:15:19] people in parking lots [crosstalk 00:15:22] Just makes people lose their minds. [crosstalk 00:15:25] Be kind everyone.

Josh Anderson:
Yeah. I hear more horns honking now than I think I have in my whole… and it’s not just me honking anymore, it’s everybody.

Nikol Prieto:
But-ah-bu-dump-bump.

Brian Norton:
Yeah. That’s why I’m the designated driver. I will drop people off at the door. I’ll go all the way to the back of the parking lot and just sit, on my phone, while people shop and then they’ll text me when they want to get picked up and I’ll go up, and pick them up.

Nikol Prieto:
That’s perfect.

Josh Anderson:
Brian, the original Uber.

Nikol Prieto:
That’s right.

Brian Norton:
The original Uber. Man. I should have patented that long ago.

Josh Anderson:
You should have. You really should have…

Josh Anderson:
Well guys, for our last section, we’ll talk about some fun things that may be assistive technology, may not, but may just be some neat stuff that you can do. So, folks who have listened to the show before know that I like watches, although I don’t wear them as much as I used to, but I was trying to find a neat or a cool, helpful watch.

Josh Anderson:
This is the… I’m going to totally mispronounce this… The Eone, E-O-N-E, watch, part of… And it’s actually called the Bradley watch. What this does is… It’s a circular watch and in it is a ball bearing that goes around, to tell you the time. What’s neat is, I don’t actually have to look at it. I can just feel down… I’ve got a triangle or something, some other kind of tactile piece to know where 12 is. I can feel where that ball bearing is and it tells me exactly what time it is. If I’m visually impaired or, if I’m just trying to figure out if this meeting’s ever going to be over, but don’t want my boss to see me look at my watch for the 15th time, I can just feel down there and have a pretty darn good idea of what time it is. So, it could definitely be useful for really anyone, but also for individuals who may have a visual disability.

Josh Anderson:
And then, another one that I found is the MPG Kids Smart Watch. Now, there’s a lot of different models of these, this is just one that I’ve found. This runs about $60 bucks, so not super duper expensive, but it’s got some pretty neat stuff. It’s got a camera function, so I can do voice chat. I can do two way HD calling. I can set it up to where they can only call Mom, Grandma, Grandpa, a neighbor, things like that. All that’s available right in there, but it also has an electric fence mode, kind of like that geo-fencing thing. I can know when they leave the house. I can know when they get even out of school or know when they’re outside, where I have this kind of setup. It does have an HD touch screen, a huge long standby battery time, because we know kids are not going to take this thing off and charge it very often, so it’s really nice.

Josh Anderson:
Water resistance… if they’re washing their hands and doing that kind of stuff, we don’t have to worry about it either. It’s really nice and even with that geo-fencing, it also has position accuracy, so I can find out exactly where they are anytime. Or I guess, if they’re smarter, I can find out where the watch is anytime… I just sit there and always, in my head, have a picture of a cat with this thing on its neck and the kid running off doing whatever the heck they want, but hopefully the kids haven’t figured that out… It’s neat enough, they’ll keep it in.

Josh Anderson:
But again, there’s a lot of these different ones. As smart watches become more popular and we see more folks with them, it’s cool that they are making these kids’ ones, that have some features that can be really helpful for individuals. Also, for individuals with disabilities, it could be very helpful as well, just because, again, finding out where folks are and what they’re doing, and have that two way communication automatically, where I can sit there and be able to see them and them see me, right there on the watch. Brian, you found something neat, too.

Brian Norton:
Yeah. So a 3D pen, it’s called 3Doodler. I think it’s [crosstalk 00:18:50] kind of a 3D doodler and if you’re creative in any way, shape or form, this could be a really fun tool or activity for really any person of any age. They have pens for all ages. They have some at the price point for some of the younger folks, they’re around $25 and they can go all the way up to $200 dollars for the pro versions of them. But if you’re like us, we’re in a creative type of work environment where we are working with lots of different individuals, they have certain needs. We want to be able to create certain things for folks and maybe we don’t… They’re not readily available. You can’t go out to the store. You want to create something, and so you can just draw it.

Brian Norton:
That’s kind of what it is. These pens basically use plastic. It heats up plastic and allows you to basically draw whatever you want, and they’ve got a whole bunch of examples on their website. Again, it’s the3doodler.com. You can go check them out there. Again. Prices are ranging anywhere from about $25 bucks, all the way up to $200 bucks, depending on what kind of activities you want to do with those. They’re really kind of a neat, interesting, possible gift for you guys to give someone if they’re creative in any way, shape or form.

Josh Anderson:
Well, I also think, because we do some different things with 3D printing, it’s kind of almost like a tiny little handheld 3D printer. I mean, it’s not going to do the same things but… and you kind of almost have to have some creativity, but for folks with any kind of sensory impairment, I think it could be [crosstalk 00:20:12] really helpful-

Brian Norton:
The tactile… On top of keyboards… Anything. Cover up a button that you don’t want them to have access to. All sorts of things.

Josh Anderson:
Oh, oh for sure. And I even think about trying to explain something, explain a giraffe to someone who’s visually impaired and never seen one… Just draw the darn thing and here feel it, and you could actually give them a little bit more information. So very, very cool.

Josh Anderson:
Nikol, we all need better sleep. [crosstalk 00:20:34] I have tiny people at home-

Nikol Prieto:
I was excited to learn about this- [crosstalk 00:20:38]

Josh Anderson:
I have work and stress. So, tell me all about this thing.

Nikol Prieto:
So if you, like myself, have trouble falling asleep… I think, even if you don’t as a regular, like I do… I think people have before, one night in their life, but… Why you stay awake is because you’re paying attention to your thoughts and they can excite you or frighten you. If you’re like me, you look at the clock. I’m like, “Oh, I’m only going to get five hours of sleep… Now I’m only going to get three hours of sleep.” Then that causes you to release neurotransmitters, which signal your brain to stay awake.

Nikol Prieto:
What this device is, it’s a small disc that you put on your nightstand and it shines a blue light up on the ceiling… And then you can touch it to turn it on and you can have an eight minute mode or 20 minute mode. Once the blue light appears on the ceiling, you’re just supposed to synchronize your breath with the light. You inhale when the light expands, you exhale when the light retracts and then this will cause a sensation of tiredness, which is conducive to you falling asleep. At the end of the exercise, it will switch itself off.

Nikol Prieto:
This is good for anyone who is six and above, in your family. And that’s just really trying to help you, and synchronize your breath, and get you into that state of relaxation, to put you to sleep. You can buy one… Did I say what it was, even? I apologize. It’s the Dodow… I think I’m not butchering that name. Dodow sleep aid, D-O-D-O-W… And you can get one disk for $60, two packs for $98, and three packs for $117.

Josh Anderson:
Oh nice. Nice.

Brian Norton:
… Oh, what, what, who, what?-

Nikol Prieto:
[crosstalk 00:22:07] Stop looking at the lights.

Speaker 5:
Stop looking at the lights, Brian.

Josh Anderson:
That’s really nice because, sometimes that’s the hardest part because you lay down and you think about all the things you have to do the next day, all the things you could have done better today, [crosstalk 00:22:15] and all that other stuff. And, yeah… Then all of a sudden it’s-

Nikol Prieto:
You’re sending signals to your brain. It’s just the way the human brain works. Yeah. Absolutely.

Josh Anderson:
Oh, most definitely. And Nikol, I took the clock out of my bedroom, like 10 years ago, because I would do the same thing. I’d roll over, “Now I’m only going to get four hours. Now I’m only going to get three hours. Now I’m going to”… Now I have no idea what time it is, so that’s kind of helpful-

Nikol Prieto:
Blissfully happy.

Josh Anderson:
Exactly, exactly. And last but not least, I did find something that’s just kind of fun. It’s called the… this brand’s called the Lightahead LED Fantasy Jellyfish Lamp. So if you think back, there used to be the lava lamp, that maybe folks had. I can remember people-

Nikol Prieto:
We still have one.

Josh Anderson:
… I was going to say people still have one and, if you touch it, you burn off your fingerprints because they get just hotter than all get out, but they’re kind of neat and they’re relaxing. They’re sensory. You can look at them, they’re kind of relaxing.

Josh Anderson:
This is the same kind of idea but, what it does is, it has these fake little plastic jelly fish in it and the way that they’re made, they sit there and they dance and they swim, and they actually look like real jellyfish. Then, the LED lights in it can make them change colors and everything, but really it’s just kind of to help with mood… Kind of like the lava lamp was. It sits there and they just kind of swim, but it’s just supposed to be relaxing and help, and just give you some different kind of, I don’t know, sensory inputs to make it a little bit nicer and a little bit better.

Josh Anderson:
It’s just kind of a neat little conversation piece to maybe have in the home. They run all kinds of different prices. The one that I’m going to put the link to is about $60 bucks for a large one. You can get a gigantic one, that’s about three and a half feet tall, for like $130 bucks, which may be a little bit too much of a conversation piece. But, still just something kind of neat, something, relaxing, something just different to have in the home, or be able to give as a gift.

Josh Anderson:
Well, guys, I can’t thank you enough for coming on the show today, and pretty much every year, where I bug you around this time of year to come on here and talk about just some of the fun little gifts… And really, and truthfully the other thing, and a great gift to me is, you’re both actually really here in the studio. I want to say, since March 2020, I have talked to maybe two, three people total in this studio and however many weeks that equals out to… So just getting to sit here and actually talk to you folks in person is, in and of itself, a gift. I do want to give you each a minute, just to talk to the listeners and maybe wish them Happy Holidays, and everything like that. So, Nikol, do you want to say bye to everybody?

Nikol Prieto:
Oh yes. I hope everybody enjoys the holiday season, take time to just relax, just rejuvenate yourself, and I hope some of these gifts are helpful. Always check our website and our library to see what kind of things we have in there for additional ideas. We have a lending library, where people can borrow equipment for free for 30 days, so there might be some gift ideas there. You can look at our website and take a look at that, but thank you for joining us. I had a really good time, and I hope you have a wonderful holiday season.

Brian Norton:
Yeah, and I’ll just echo some of that. Thank you for listening to our podcasts. You’re on the Accessibility Channel, AT Update, A-T-F-A-Q and Accessibility Minute. We appreciate our listeners, the feedback that you give us. We love what we do here and it’s all because of you guys. Thank you guys for being faithful listeners. Have a great holiday season. We are grateful for you guys, and I hope you guys are able to find some of the joy in the holiday, being around family. Never take that for granted and just enjoy who you get to spend time with. Thank you for listening. I hope some of these products you might be interested in, and might go out and try. If you do, let us know what your experience is with those, love to hear about that. Thank you again and have a great holiday season.

Josh Anderson:
And I’ll just echo what Brian and Nikol said there. Thank you so much for listening, everybody, to our show. I hope you have a wonderful holiday season. I hope that Thanksgiving was wonderful, Black Friday was wonderful and the whole holiday season is great for you, whatever that might look like.

Josh Anderson:
Do you have a question about assistive technology? Do you have a suggestion for someone we should interview on Assistive Technology Update? If you do, call our Listener Line at 317-721-7124. Shoot us a note on Twitter, @INDATAproject, or check us out on Facebook. Are you looking for a transcript or show notes? Head on over to our website at www.eastersealstech.com. Assistive Technology Update is a proud member of the Accessibility Channel. For more shows like this, plus so much more, head over to accessibilitychannel.com. The views expressed by our guests are not necessarily that of this host or the INDATA project. This has been your Assistive Technology Update. I’m Josh Anderson with the INDATA project at Easter Seals Crossroads in Indianapolis, Indiana. Thank you so much for listening and we’ll see you next time.

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